September 25, 2003
The CIA-led Iraq Survey Group (ISG) of 1,400 weapons staff and experts find... nothing

An intensive six-month search of Iraq for weapons of mass destruction has failed to discover a single trace of an illegal arsenal, according to accounts of a report circulating in Washington and London. "It will mainly be an accounting of programmes and dual-use technologies," said one US intelligence source. "It demonstrates that the main judgments of the national intelligence estimate (NIE) in October 2002, that Saddam had hundreds of tonnes of chemical and biological agents ready, are false." WMD

Last week Bush admitted that Iraq had nothing to do with the September 11 world trade center attacks. This week Bush went to the UN to insist against all available evidence that we were "right" to invade Iraq and that the cheese eating surrender monkeys (The French) were wrong. Surprisingly this did not result in a commitment for French "boots on the ground".

The next step you wonder? Bush will declare victory and bring the troops home.

An intensive six-month search in Iraq for weapons of mass destruction has failed to discover a single trace of an illegal arsenal, the British Guardian newspaper quoted a report circulating in Washington and London as saying on Thursday.

The report, which was compiled by the Iraq Survey Group (ISG) of 1,400 weapons experts and support staff led by US Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) and is expected to be published next month, will instead focus on former Iraqi President Saddam Hussein's capacity and intentions to build banned weapons, the paper said.

"It will mainly be an accounting of programs and dual-use technologies," the paper quoted a US intelligence source as saying, adding that drafts of the report have been sent to the White House, the Pentagon and the Downing Street.

The BBC reported Wednesday that the survey group, which includes British and Austrian investigators, had come across no weapons of mass destruction (WMD), or delivery systems, or laboratories involved in developing such weapons.

The report is expected to include computer programs, files, paperwork and pictures suggesting Saddam's regime was developing a WMD program, the BBC said.

Although the United States and Britain were likely to focus on documentary evidence that the Saddam regime was capable of producing WMD, the Guardian said, the report would fall far short of proving Iraq was an "imminent threat" even to its neighbors.

The disclosure seems not to be a piece of good news for British Prime Minister Tony Blair, who put forward Iraq's banned weapons as the reason for going to the US-led war in Iraq and has been insisting that the weapons would be found.

Posted by tstubbs at September 25, 2003 01:41 PM | Trackback
Comments
Post a comment
Name:


Email Address:


URL:


Comments:


Remember info?